WWII in Photographs
fuehrerbefehl:

(Click for Hi-res)
Hitler and his entourage at the opening of the Autobahn.

fuehrerbefehl:

(Click for Hi-res)

Hitler and his entourage at the opening of the Autobahn.

waffenss1972:

Infantry attack under cover of T 34-76 in the Battle of Kursk 

waffenss1972:

Infantry attack under cover of T 34-76 in the Battle of Kursk 

greasegunburgers:

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, fear that the Japanese would follow up with attacks on the west coast led to the State of California to mobilize its State Guard and institute other defensive measures. One such measure was authorization for local communities to form Licensed Militia Companies under the collective name, California State Militia. Once formed these units would apply to the Adjutant General for approval of its state license. Between 1942 and 1942, 331 such units were raised. Upon assuming office in 1943, Governor Earl Warren merged the State Militia into the State Guard and their mission changed from a defense force to that of a constabulary and internal security force.

The Chinese, Filipino, and Korean communities in the state were anxious to show their loyalty and quickly formed such units.

The two best documented units were the California Chinese reserve and the California Korean Reserve of Los Angeles. Both unit participated jointly and appear to have operated National Guard’s Exposition Park Armory.

A less well known unit, the 17th Infantry Regiment, was formed in San Francisco’s China Town.

There was also at least one Filipino unit organized during the same timeframe. However, other than examples of their insignia little is known about these units.

Check out the images attached of the California Chinese and Korean Reserves, California State Militia.

oberherrbetz:

Sein Tod war schrecklich.

oberherrbetz:

Sein Tod war schrecklich.

waffenss1972:

Soviet soldiers and GMC truck on the street of the Czech town Leickove

waffenss1972:

Soviet soldiers and GMC truck on the street of the Czech town Leickove

thehistorylover:

Eva Braun+ sun glasses

operationbarbarossa:

Wojtek, a Syrian brown bear, was the mascot of the 22nd Polish Artillery Support Company (22 Kompania Zaopartrywania Artylerii) of the Second Polish Corps. Found in the Persian mountains in 1942, he was adopted and traveled with the unit throughout the Middle East and Italy during WWII. He is reported to have helped move artillery ammunition at Monte Cassino, as depicted in the banner (above). After the war he was kept at the Edinburgh Zoo and was made a life member of the Scottish Polish Society. Wojtek passed away in 1963.

The first 5 photos above were taken during the Polish unit’s time in the Middle East in 1942.

The bottom photo is of Wojtek at the Winfield Aerodrome near Hutton in Berwickshire, the unit’s temporary home after the war; 1945.

(source)

pilotsandpuppies:

Dachshund squadron mascots sits on top of a P-51